Lizzie Buckmaster Dove

Object Urbanites 2015

26 June – 6 September
Maitland Regional Gallery

A few notes about the floor works;

High Tide, New Moon 2015, 1.75 meter diameter, sea-washed coal pebbles, shells and random sea ephemera

This work is constructed using sea washed pebbles of coal, found close to where I live in the Illawarra. The pebbles have been among the multitude of things I’ve pocketed as I’ve walked this coastline for the last 8 years.

I’ve arranged the pebbles in the shape of an antique lace doily to signify the overlaying of one culture (European) upon another (indigenous Australia).

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High Tide, New Moon 2015, 1.75 meter diameter, sea-washed coal pebbles, shells and random sea ephemera

This work is constructed using sea washed pebbles of coal, found close to where I live in the Illawarra. The pebbles have been among the multitude of things I’ve pocketed as I’ve walked this coastline for the last 8 years.

I’ve arranged the pebbles in the shape of an antique lace doily to signify the overlaying of one culture (European) upon another (indigenous Australia).

It was during early white settlement that colonialists first spotted coal in the Illawarra as they travelled by boat from the south. Coal seams are very visible in the cliff face. It is what first brought settlers to the area.

The pebbles aren’t always present on the beach. They move on and off shore with the tides and mostly accumulate along the high tide line, often in ‘ribbons’.

The title High Tide operates on multiple levels; the literal ‘high tide’ line along which I collected the pebbles; a geo-political ‘high tide’ regarding the world consumption of fossil fuels and Australia’s economic dependency on coal; ‘high tide’ in terms of our country’s history of the appalling treatment of indigenous people since white settlement.

The circle measures 1.75 m diameter, the average height of the highest tides on the two new moons that occur during the exhibition dates, June 26 – September 6.

 

High Tide, Blue Moon July 31 2015, 2 meters, found concrete

During the exhibition there is a blue moon (the second full moon in a calendar month), on July 31. The highest tide on that day is 2 metres, the diameter of the circle.

The circle is made using concrete extracted from the sea pool in Coledale in the Illawarra. The Illawarra has the highest density of sea pools in all of Australia and their presence is directly related to the coal and steel industry (it is rumored people didn’t have running water in their homes but neither could most people swim and so the pools’ were created to provide safe areas to bathe).

The Illawarra and the Hunter region share similar industrial histories with a similar proximity to Sydney. I find this quite intriguing in citing this work here.

The work is created using material that was part of Pool, the Alchemy of Blue which was exhibited at Wollongong Art Gallery in 2013. There is more information about that project, in the works section.