Lizzie Buckmaster Dove

Still Light 2010

June 1 – 19, 2010
NG Art Gallery, 3 Little Queen St, Chippendale

Lizzie Buckmaster Dove’s new works have left the walls and explode into the room with a determined presence, barely contained by fragile domes and boxes. They glow with the light of the ocean, and its accompanying skies, beside which she now dwells. The constructed landscape is liberated and returns to its essence.

Buckmaster Dove’s journeys through the lands and times of her ancestors have led to a rich and generous creative process. The traveler who knows how to pause – in London often in front of a Victorian wunderkammer or in a walled garden, she is, in the words of Lucy Lippard, ‘a nomad with a serially monogamous passion for place[1]‘.

 

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Lizzie Buckmaster Dove’s new works have left the walls and explode into the room with a determined presence, barely contained by fragile domes and boxes. They glow with the light of the ocean, and its accompanying skies, beside which she now dwells. The constructed landscape is liberated and returns to its essence.

Buckmaster Dove’s journeys through the lands and times of her ancestors have led to a rich and generous creative process. The traveler who knows how to pause – in London often in front of a Victorian wunderkammer or in a walled garden, she is, in the words of Lucy Lippard, ‘a nomad with a serially monogamous passion for place[1]‘.

The dualistic systems of the world limit our spirits and solutions. By transposing selected systems, Buckmaster Dove promotes an interdependent network, opening up the cultural and physical landscape to a connected future. On first returning to Australia her works were preoccupied with a new reading of the past referencing museology practices and constructed from second hand books, often revealing a ghosting of the pre-colonial landscape. The works in Still Light belong to a more present and possibly prescient space, and reference contemporary colour ordering codes and nomenclature.

Now firmly rooted again, she is able to stretch within the work, exploring identity, authenticity and sense of place within a fractured global context. In Cluster of Ideas the individual works have a deliberate localness, to a particular valley, or beach, but allude to our own familiar. Rebecca Solnit describes a similar convergence as ‘by grounding voice, such thinking deconstructs authoritative versions, voices, histories; by denying the possibility of a voice that is nowhere, voices begin to arise everywhere, and the hitherto silenced speak[2]‘. In Tide Project, Things to be Forgotten she playfully exposes a hesitant Englishness where we depend on the physical things we know and trust, with their aging and lasting – castles, orchards, lichen, trout and roses[3], in juxtaposition with an Australianess that seems to expand beyond the interior into an epic and yet sometimes illusionary scale – dusty sky, fairy dust, solar burst, orange flash, tiger eye, and renegade[4].

The works of Still Light are subliminal propaganda for our times. They hold no easy happiness despite an immediate prettiness – the more considered, the more alarming the implications of our actions. They do however offer hopeful reassurance – the precise and assiduous cuts do not dissect but construct, do not bisect but reconnect the other, the lost, the extinguished – the blade articulating that which we are unable to define.

Buckmaster Dove has established ‘A Room of One’s Own[5]‘. By locating her everyday within an open landscape, she has activated a powerful rhythm with which to roam, think and trust her blade. It is a joy to behold.

 

Anna Hart, January 2010, London



[1] Lippard, Lucy R. The Lure of the Local, The New Press. New York, 1997 page 6

[2] Solnit, Rebecca Storming the Gates of Paradise, Landscapes for Politics University of California Press 2007 page 285

[3] Farrow and Ball Colour Book 2010

[4] Taubmans Top 200 2010

[5] Woolf, Virginia  A Room of One’s Own Hogarth Press 1929