Lizzie Buckmaster Dove

Year of Walking 2014

The Illawarra has a unique history of sea pools, with the highest density in all of Australia. The pools are intimately intertwined with it’s mining history and refer to a past that was egalitarian. They provide a rich cultural heritage and a sense of identity and connection to place. Year of Walking operates as a love song to this history – a gesture to the lyric, romantic, poetic and sublime.

 

Prints are available as an edition of 10, 13 x 13 cm on archival fine art paper.

Other sizes are available upon request.

Send me an email on the contact page to place an order.

 

 

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The Illawarra has a unique history of sea pools, with the highest density in all of Australia. The pools are intimately intertwined with it’s mining history and refer to a past that was egalitarian. They provide a rich cultural heritage and a sense of identity and connection to place. Year of Walking operates as a love song to this history – a gesture to the lyric, romantic, poetic and sublime.

Beginning with the lunar year in February 2013, Lizzie Buckmaster Dove walked a daily route along the same stretch of coast in Coledale for twelve months. Taking her past the Coledale sea pools, she photographed them in all their seasonal and situational variations – full sun, rain, with storms approaching, when the pool was completely submerged, from up high on the cliffs above. The documentation of the pools formed an intimate part of the development of her project Pool, the Alchemy of Blue which was exhibited at the Wollongong Art Gallery April – June 2013.

Lizzie says, ‘We know the pool is manmade but set within the rock platform it appears part of the natural landscape. Parts of the pool that have broken away reappear battered and sea-washed among sand and rocks (to be pocketed), reminding us that the sea is wearing, every thing returns to the elemental, we too will return to the earth. Pool, the Alchemy of Blue isn’t about ruin but about transformation; abstract concepts are rendered in a concrete material; weight becomes light; concrete appears to float; the impossible becomes possible and the intimacy of individual pieces of concrete seem to belie the immensity of the pool, the rock platform, the stretching sea and vast sky.’